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Plane Crash Injures One, Damages Building

Plane Crash Injures One, Damages Building

Over the weekend, a small plane crashed onto a roof injuring one and damaging the building. The accident happened in Pomona, California. The Piper PA-28, a small single engine plane, crashed on top of an industrial building in Southern California. The plane was traveling to Brackett Field Airport before it crashed. Aerial pictures taken by the local news shows the nose of the plane had crashed through the roof. One of the passengers received medical attention for minor injuries. No one was injured in the building.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board, accidents among personal plane flights have increased by 20% in the last decade. The NTSB also reports that the fatality rate for personal flights is up 25 %. Statistics prove that private planes are far more dangerous than commercial flights.

Tragic accidents happen every day in our nation. Many are caused by the negligence or misconduct of any other person. While some accidents are unpreventable, many accidents can be avoided. If you or someone you love has suffered an injury of catastrophic levels, then your life has been changed forever. Do not go through this alone, but allow the best St. Louis personal injury attorneys at Meyerkord & Meyerkord, LLC to represent you. Insurance companies will offer you the minimum compensation for your damages, while the attorneys at Meyerkord & Meyerkord, LLC, will fight for the maximum financial compensation for the damages you suffered. Just ask the hundreds of clients who have already received over $350 million in paid claims! Contact us for a free consultation today.

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